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We live in the now. That's all there is. As I've said many times..."The past is gone, the future hasn't arrived, but when it does...it will be now." My students know this. I've been discussing it with them for years. There are thousands of them who have heard my thoughts (as I have theirs), asked me about now, argued with me about then, and tried to convince me about planning for the future. We've spent countless hours of nowness discussing this topic. While hopefully enlightening each other along the way.

Quite often a person will ask me, "If we're always living in the now, does that mean we don't plan for the future?" My answer never varies. "No...it only means that you plan for the future in the now. You can't live in the future, but you can plan for it - just don't obsess over it or you'll never enjoy the now." Of course, none of us know what our future will be, how long it will last, or when it may end. Yet, we long for it (all too often) without reveling in the present. Some people constantly plan for the future. They work for retirement, learn for the opportunities of later, and save for something they may (or may never) obtain. I'm not saying that's a bad thing. Who am I to dictate? But - from my observations...they often become detached from the reality of the pleasure of the moment.

However, time has a way of moving forward. At least in this reality. So...it's only natural to plan for future nows. The problem (in my estimation) is that far too many people never enjoy the moment they're in. They worry about this and that, are concerned over later events, and spend excessive hours pondering over things that may not be. All the while...their now becomes the past and their future become a carrot dangling on a stick, while the beauty of now passes in front of their eyes unnoticed.

To paraphrase a saying I heard many years ago. There isn't a person who, on their death bed, has said that they wish they would have closed another deal, made a bit more money, or purchased another piece of jewelry. Yet, you can rest assured that there have been plenty of folks who've said they wish they had more time to have more nows.



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