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Yes...it's true. Size really does matter. In fact, it not only effects your life - but it will certainly effect the lives of others as well.

No, I'm not talking about an outward physical trait. What I'm addressing here is the size of a few things that are far more important. How "big" is your heart? How "broad" is your mind?

Living with a "big heart" and a "broad mind" enables you to spread good energy, see things in a more accepting manner, and allows you to learn more easily. A "narrow mind" and "closed heart" tends to drive people, who may add texture, love, and kindness, to your life...away. What you are left with are only those with the same "closed heart" perspective and "narrow mindset" as yourself. That will, most assuredly, limit your view of life and will stunt your ability to grow as well. 

However, the toughest part is to be able to admit to yourself that you have a "closed heart" and a "narrow mind." It takes a lot of intestinal fortitude to recognize one's shortcomings. And...even more to want to change. A "broad, or open, mind" and a "big heart" may cause a person discomfort at first because it goes against what one has "stood for" his or her entire life. Yet...once they are achieved a person frees himself, or herself, from the negative energy and the physical affects that a "small heart" and a "narrow mind" causes.

If you've ever be around negative people (or you are one yourself), their faces emit the affects that their negativity creates. A positive person is lighter, happier, and less stressed. Closing one's heart and one's mind will, ultimately, increase one's stress and also cause physical ailments.

So...be aware of the "size" of your heart and mind. Open them both. It will allow you the freedom to pass on an overly stressful and judgmental life. And - give you the rewards that go with a "big heart" and a "broad mind." 


 
My take on authenticity and mental trash within the context of trust, love, and compassion.
 
Or...banking on the fact that: "People can never get enough of what they don't really need."
For years I owned a marketing firm. Still dabble in it. In fact...I teach it at the university level.

During my firm's early years I had a partner who had worked for a well-known national magazine. He was the publisher of special guides that would come out during the year focusing on different categories of products. Cars, electronics, clothes, etc. would be the highlighted in all their beauty. I remember him saying that they would be lighted and displayed in such a way as to make them "sensual." 

Yes...sex (and anything else that gratifies the senses) sells, even when that sensuality is transmitted through things. Mind you, I'm not talking about some beautiful being standing next to an automobile or holding a bottle of wine...I'm speaking about the things themselves.The textures, colors, designs, and other facets that go into the manufacturing of an item are often more important than it's function or reliability. And - the lighting and positioning of that product when it's photographed do as much to make them desirable as their design.

People are easily seduced...very easily seduced. Most consumers buy first with their eyes, then...secondly, with their minds. How does one avoid the trap of the "sensual seduction of things?" Initially, one has to realize that it exists. Next, I would suggest asking the question, "Do I really need this?" The answer is probably "No!" Then...comes the "want factor." Ah...the naughtiness of it all. Marketers depend on that. Now, I'm not saying that's a bad thing. But - I'm certainly not saying it's a good things either. The job of the marketers is to get you to buy what, quite often, you really don't need. I regularly add to that statement: "With money you don't really have."

Motorcycles, cars, clothes, shoes, electronic devices, food, as well as just about every other area of "Thingdom," is made to make you want to salivate, desire, caress, "love," and possess them. They are our substitutes for the real thing...other people. 

As I teach, write, train, discuss, and guide people in their pursuit of building their businesses and selling their products, I am not ignorant to the fact that, if people truly love other people and have a wonderful relationship with their friends and loved one...the need for things often diminishes. But - I also know that we are beings who also love to create as well. So - balance, it seems, is the key. Work towards achieving entrepreneurial Nirvana, while making sure to remember that people are always more important than things. That - should help make for a totally "sense-ual" existence!
 
Many students, seminar/workshop attendees, and friends, ask me what they can do to start the change process. My video outlines some initial steps that anyone can take.
 
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Goodness sounds simple enough. Do good things and someone (perhaps even yourself) will get some sort of benefit in return.

However, doing good deeds has become distorted for many. All my life I have heard people tell me, dictate to others, or make remarks for their self-aggrandizement - that the reason you (or they) do good is so that, in the end...you will be "saved," go to a "higher place," reach the "top of the mountain," get into "heaven," or some other greater reward that becomes attached to the act itself. I never bought into that. I understand it...but it doesn't ring true to me.

Shouldn't we do good things for the sake of just doing good things. Isn't it selfish to want to do good for some reward at the end of life, the road, or the relationship. Whatever happened to good for goodness sake?! If you extrapolate it...doesn't doing good for a "higher" selfish reward, or other "grander" motive kind of cancel the goodness out? I know that from the point of the good deed it doesn't (it still happened), but from the overall perspective...it sort of does.

Perhaps we need to complicate our lives, makes things more than they are, or give a greater justification to being a good person. Personally, I think being a good person is justification enough. We're only here for a finite amount of time. None of us really knows what happens after we're gone. Except, perhaps, that our intrinsic energy and physical being gets dispersed into the universe and/or the Earth to be recycled into whatever - electricity, air molecules, soil, food, other people's energy, or a myriad of other uses.

So...rather than put some hypothetical reason onto doing good, or being a good person, why not just do good. Be kind, be respectful, be loving, be caring, be good for goodness sake. And - do it, not for some grand reward, but...because it's the right thing to do. Oh yeah - and from a slightly, less grander, perspective...it just may make you feel good too.



 
I'm like every other human in an industrialized country...I'm bombarded with advertising. Everything is for sale. Of course, as I mentioned in an earlier post, the object of marketing is to make you feel insecure on some level so that buying what they're selling will, supposedly, make you feel better about yourself.

The beauty industry is chuck full of this tactic. And...not just for woman, but men as well. You must have a "certain look." to be thought of as beautiful. Or - act a certain way to be in with the "beautiful people." Regardless of the cream you apply to your skin, the deodorant you use under your arms, the spray, color, or gel that permeates your hair, or the makeup you put on your face, one thing is always overlooked...you can't make your inside beautiful by buying some sort of cosmetic.

Yes...we all have our chemical attractions to another person. There's a physical look that turns us on. The sound of one's voice, the way a person carries himself or herself, their build, certain parts of their bodies, their hair, smile, eye color, and teeth, all play a role in attraction. Still, it's all for naught if the inside isn't developed, is miserable, negative, insecure, narcissistic, or any myriad of things that negates the beauty on the outside.

Did you ever look at someone and think that they were a beautiful specimen of a human being? Of course you have. Did you then have the opportunity to get to know them and find out that, within a short amount of time, you realized that their inside didn't match their outside at all? And then...no longer found them as attractive, or maybe even, wanted to get away from them as fast as possible?

We work so hard on our outward appearance that we forget that what's on the inside is more important. What makes a happy couple? Of course, they have to be physically attracted to each other, but...what keeps them together comes from within.

When you look in the mirror, think about the qualities that make up who you are. What legacy would you leave if you died today? I know it's a morbid thought, but...it's an important one. Would people say that you were a good, caring, loving, compassionate person? Geez...perhaps they'd also think that you were attractive (which is a relative term) too. Or...would they just say that you were good looking but not someone others wanted to be around. Or - at the very least was tough to be around?

The question is real. The reactions are real. That's life. You may be rich and not liked, rich and loved, poor and hard to feel close to, or poor and deeply loved. Money has nothing to do with it. It's about you and what's inside. Take stock of who you are and what others will say about you when you're gone. You may not care. But...those around you will. One way or another our legacy lives on and our impact on others continues long after we're dust.